New court filing: Government denies misconduct in Aaron Schock investigation

Sources: FBI investigating disgraced congressman
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Story highlights

  • Former Rep. Aaron Schock was indicted on fraud charges last November
  • Attorneys for the government say that Schock's office manager voluntarily agreed to be interviewed

(CNN)Federal prosecutors are denying any misconduct in response to former Illinois Rep. Aaron Schock's claim that the FBI used one of his staff members to secretly record conversations with his staff and "steal" numerous documents from his office.

In a new 61-page court filing out late Tuesday, prosecutors reveal that the approval to record Schock came from high-level officials within the Department of Justice, including sign off from the deputy assistant attorney general at the time, and the informant was given very specific instructions about avoiding any conversations between Schock and his attorney.
Prosecutors say that Schock's office manager voluntarily agreed to be interviewed by law enforcement agents and freely shared other materials with agents.
    "From the beginning of the investigation that led to his indictment, Defendant Schock has engaged in an increasingly aggressive search for some governmental misconduct claim, initially to forestall the indictment, and now to avoid the trial on the merits," attorneys for the government wrote in Tuesday's filing. "In these motions, Defendant Schock futilely attempts to manufacture claims of governmental misconduct during the course of the investigation."
    Schock's lawyers declined to comment to CNN request for comment. They're expected to file additional motions in the coming days.
    Schock was indicted on fraud charges last November after an investigation revealed that he allegedly used taxpayer money to fund lavish trips and events. He has pleaded not guilty to all charges.
    According to the prosecutors' new filing, Schock can be heard on tape discussing the federal investigation and instructing the informant what to say to the grand jury.
    Schock claimed in a discovery motion last month that certain communications and other materials obtained by the informant have been improperly withheld from the defense team.
    Yet prosecutors now argue that he's already received a large volume of discovery, will receive more, and the remainder he isn't legally entitled to in any event.
    Schock's spending drew attention last year after news surfaced that he had decked out his congressional office in the style of the popular PBS drama "Downton Abbey" -- an accusation he vehemently denied. He later ended up paying the federal government back $40,000 for the decor.