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CNN LIVE EVENT/SPECIAL

Governor George Pataki, President Bush Address Republican National Convention

Aired September 2, 2004 - 21:35   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


LARRY KING, CNN ANCHOR: Wolf Blitzer and the gang will be on following the speech. Stay right with us. There's Governor Pataki.
GOV. GEORGE PATAKI, NEW YORK: Thank you, delegates and friends.

I've been governor of this state for 10 years, through challenge...

(APPLAUSE)

... through challenge and triumph. And tonight is a great New York night.

I'm going to be brief, because tonight we hear from President George W. Bush.

(APPLAUSE)

The past few evenings we've spoken of September 11th, of our heroes and of those we lost.

But there's a part of this story that has never fully been told. I'd like to tell it.

After September 11th, our tourism industry was hit hard. Do you know what the people of Oregon did? A thousand people from Oregon came to New York and rented 1,000 hotel rooms so our workers and desk clerks and waiters could keep their jobs.

(APPLAUSE)

Where is the Oregon delegation?

Oregon, please stand? Thank you.

(APPLAUSE)

After September 11th, the people of Iowa heard that our guys at Ground Zero were getting cold, working through the night. So Iowa rushed 1,500 quilts to help keep them warm.

Iowa delegation will you please stand? Thank you.

(APPLAUSE)

Pennsylvania, where are you?

(APPLAUSE)

Five brothers in your state -- five brothers in your state had been saving for years to go to Disney World. They had saved almost $900.

After September 11th, the boys drove to Brooklyn to a fire house that just lost eight men. They gave their Disney World money to the relief fund.

Pennsylvania, you raised those boys.

(APPLAUSE)

Please stand. Thank you.

(APPLAUSE)

Now, I could tell a story like this about every single state in the country. But there was, of course, another state.

It woke up one morning and walked the kids to school, and suddenly the streets were full of sirens and there was fire in the sky.

You know what they did, the people of this state?

They charged into the towers. They stood on line like soldiers to give blood.

And then, in the days and nights that followed, the tough men and women of our great city came forward.

They quieted the fire and dug us out of grief. They got into trucks and went to Ground Zero, the construction workers and iron workers, our police officers and firefighters.

And the people of our city stood in the dark each night, waving flags, and calling out, "God bless you," as the trucks hurtled by.

And the men and women on those trucks waved back as if to say, "Hey, no problem."

This great state rolled up its sleeves, looked terrorism straight in the face and spat in its eye.

Ladies and gentlemen, I give you New York.

(APPLAUSE)

On that terrible day, a nation became a neighborhood. All Americans became New Yorkers.

So what I've wanted to do for a long time was to say thank you, in front of our country, and with our children watching. Thank you, America, from the very bottom of New York's heart.

(APPLAUSE)

And now, we have some business to do.

Every four years people say, "This is the most important election of our lifetime." This time it's true.

We have a choice between two very different men, different views, different histories.

I know them both. We were at college together, the president a year behind me, Senator Kerry a year ahead.

John Kerry was head of the Liberal Union, I was head of the Conservative Union.

(APPLAUSE)

We never got to debate back then. But the senator has asked for a full and frank discussion. Well, let's start now.

(APPLAUSE)

I want to help voters compare President Bush's record of achievement with Senator Kerry's. That way they'll be able to see the difference, which is that President Bush has a record of achievement.

(APPLAUSE)

Almost four years ago, George W. Bush raised his right hand and took the oath of office. And from the first, he showed us something we hadn't seen in a while. When he said he was going to do something, he meant it. And then he did it.

(APPLAUSE)

Given recent history, that's amazing.

He inherited a recession. And then came September 11th. But George Bush said he would turn around the economy and create new jobs.

He said he'd do it. And he did.

(APPLAUSE)

He said he would cut taxes on the middle class and ease the tax burden on all Americans.

He said he'd do it. And he did.

(APPLAUSE)

He said he'd help small businesses, protect Social Security and expand home ownership. He said he'd do it. And he did.

He said he'd apply tougher standards to our schools. He'd help our seniors get the prescription drug coverage they need.

He said he'd do it. And he did.

And George Bush said he'd fight to allow the power of faith to help our young and help our troubled.

He said he'd do it. And he did.

There's much more, but you get the point.

George W. Bush says what he means, he means what he says. You can trust him.

(APPLAUSE)

Well, what can we say of Senator Kerry? He was for the war and then he was against the war. He was for it, but he wouldn't fund it. Then he'd fund it, but he wasn't for it. He was for the Patriot Act until he was against the Patriot Act. Or was he against it until he was for it? I forget. He probably does, too.

(APPLAUSE)

This is a candidate who has to Google his own name to find out where he stands.

(APPLAUSE)

You saw their convention a few weeks ago. They had a slogan: "Hope is on the way." But with all their flip-flopping and zig- zagging their real slogan should be, "Hype is on the way."

(APPLAUSE)

You know, as Republicans we're lucky.

This fall we're going to win one for the Gipper.

(APPLAUSE)

But our opponents, they're going lose one with the Flipper.

(APPLAUSE)

I thank God that on September 11th, we had a president who didn't wring his hands and wonder what America had done wrong to deserve this attack.

I thank God we had a president who understood that America was attacked, not for what we had done wrong, but for what we do right.

(APPLAUSE) The president took strong action to protect our country. That sounds like something any president would do. How I wish that were so.

You know the history. Osama bin Laden declared war on America -- and then came the attacks -- the first World Trade Center, the embassies, the USS Cole, hundreds dead, thousands injured.

How I wish the administration at that time, in those years, had done something.

(APPLAUSE)

How I wished they had moved to protect us. But they didn't do it.

On September 11th, al Qaeda attacked again. But this time they made a terrible mistake. There's one thing they didn't bank on. They didn't bank on George W. Bush.

(APPLAUSE)

He didn't run from history. He didn't run from history; he faced it.

George Bush raised our spirits. He came to New York, and stood on that smoking heap, looked at our heroes and said: I can hear you, and soon the whole world will hear you.

He declared a new doctrine: The United States would find and remove terrorists, whoever they are and wherever they are. And if you harbor them, there will be hell to pay.

(APPLAUSE)

He mobilized our forces and went to Afghanistan, where the United States fought and won a war.

al Qaeda camps were pulverized, the Taliban deposed.

George Bush protected our country, and he protects it still.

(APPLAUSE)

With supreme guts and rightness, President Bush went into Iraq. The U.S. had asked for peace, went to the U.N. time and again, asked Saddam to step aside. But Saddam would not be moved.

So President Bush moved him.

Our American troops, our citizen soldiers, and the coalition of the willing moved him. And soon a dictator who had used poison gas on his own people was found cowering in the earth.

Some people have called this an abuse of power. I call it progress. (APPLAUSE)

There are those who still say that there was no reason to liberate Iraq. They ask about weapons of mass destruction.

On September 11th in New York we learned that in the hands of a monster, a box cutter is a weapon of mass destruction.

And Saddam Hussein was a monster, a walking, talking weapon of mass destruction.

It is good for the world that he is gone.

(APPLAUSE)

Where does Senator Kerry stand on all this? In Boston, he said that in the future "any attack would be met with a swift and certain response."

Well, respectfully, Senator, that's not good enough. We've already been attacked, time and again.

And President Bush understands we can't just wait for the next attack. We have to go after them, in their training camps, in their hiding places, in their spider holes, before they have the chance to attack us again.

(APPLAUSE)

Senator Kerry says -- Senator Kerry says, "America should go to war not when it wants to go to war but when it has to go to war."

Well, Senator, the firefighters and cops who ran into those burning towers and died on September 11th didn't want to go to war. They were heroes in a war they didn't even know existed. America did not choose this war. But we have a president who chooses to win it.

(APPLAUSE)

AUDIENCE: Four more years. Four more years. Four more years.

This is no ordinary time. This is no ordinary time. The stakes could not be higher. Fate has handed our generation a grave new threat to freedom. And fortune has given us a leader who will defend that freedom. This is no ordinary time.

And George W. Bush is no ordinary leader.

(APPLAUSE)

I'm a New Yorker.

I'm a New Yorker. We've got a lot of feeling deep down, though we don't always show it.

But let me ask you: What is this election about if it isn't about our love of freedom?

A love for all we are, and can be -- for that old Liberty Bell in Philadelphia, for Constitution Hall, for that island, Ellis Island, where the whole world's people came to share in our freedom.

And love, too, for that statue in New York's great grand harbor. That noble statue that greeted the lonely, and seemed by her very grandeur to be telling them, "Take heart, take heart, it's going to be better here."

We had to close her down after September 11th. But we opened her again a few weeks ago.

That was a good day.

(APPLAUSE)

And now she stands, tall and immovable, lighting the way to dreams, that symbol of hope, that Statue of Liberty.

Ladies and gentlemen, on this night and in this fight there is another who holds high that torch of freedom. He is one of those men God and fate somehow lead to the fore in times of challenge. And he is lighting the way to better times, a safer land, and hope.

He is my friend, he is our president, President George W. Bush.

(APPLAUSE)

Thank you.

(APPLAUSE)

Thank you.

WOLF BLITZER, CNN ANCHOR: George Pataki, the governor of New York state introducing the president. The president will be speaking shortly. He's expected to speak for about one hour. A very powerful speech, Judy.

JUDY WOODRUFF, CNN ANCHOR: A lot...

JEFF GREENFIELD, CNN ANCHOR: ... history. 1924, the governor of New York, Franklin D. Roosevelt, nominates Al Smith for president. That sets him on the road to the White House. George Pataki is thinking about running for president. This speech at this time, quite possibly the launching pad.

BLITZER: Judy.

WOODRUFF: It may well be. You know that George Pataki is interested in running in 2008. People around him will tell you that. But what we heard tonight, Wolf, more red meat about John Kerry. More talk about back and forth. The crowd doing this tic toc thing. One thing and another. But I think Democrats are going to come back and raise the question, he's saying that the United States needs to be prepared to go looking for terrorists before they attack us. But where else is that going to be? Are we talking about attacking Iran? Are we talking about Syria, North Korea? I mean, where are these places that the United States is going to launch another attack before the U.S. has launched attacks again?

BLITZER: The so-called axis of evil. I've been very impressed at how disciplined the Republicans have been, all the major speakers on the talking points. The same themes. The same flip-flop. The same kind of, where's the consistency of John Kerry? They've been very, very strong on that.

WOODRUFF: Yes, they have.

GREENFIELD: Look at what Pataki did in contrast to say, Zell Miller. Look at the humor. This is probably the first convention where the word google has ever been heard, which is a nice gesture to a younger generation. It was done with a lighter touch, as opposed to the 2 by 4 we heard last night.

WOODRUFF: That's right.

BLITZER: Jeff, what are you going to be looking for specificly from the president tonight.

GREENFIELD: Funny you should ask, Wolf. There are three questions as opposed to the four we had in the primaries. I want to suggest first, will the second term be different? Most voters say they are not entirely happy with the first term. They would have change in (UNINTELLIGIBLE). Can he seek to change as the incumbent.

Second how tough on Kerry, something we've been talking about already. Is it going to be humorous, is going to be (UNINTELLIGIBLE)? How tough will he be.

And, third, George W. Bush, regular guy? Ed Gillespie the Republican national chairman has stressed the importance of this convention showcase George Bush's likability which is one of his most powerful political assets. Can he make that part of an acceptance speech? As we bad (ph) reporters say, only time will tell.

BLITZER: And Judy, that likability will be showcased in part by the format that they've created here. Let's explain to our viewers what they've done differently on this night as opposed to the last three nights.

WOODRUFF: That's right. Literally overnight they transformed Madison Square Garden. Whereas last night and the first three nights of the convention you had the typical stage platform. Tonight the platform has come out into the middle of the hall. The delegates have been moved out of the way and they've put on a very elegant carpet, which is a replica of the presidential seal. And you know, when you think about television and modern conventions are all about television, that's exactly what they had in mind here.

You know, Wolf, I want to get back on the likability point. One thing I'm going to be looking for is how much is President Bush going to reassure the American people that he's someone they can become?

There are people out there tonight thinking there is a man who took this country Iraq. They're not sure that was the right war. They want to make sure that he's not going to do that again unless they think it's for the right reasons.

BLITZER: And I want to give our viewers a little heads up, what to expect. This is busy night of politics. Not only will the president be speaking but John Kerry will be speaking at midnight tonight in Ohio at a rally. CNN will have live coverage of that as well. Senator Fred Thompson, former senator from Tennessee, is going to be narrating a film now. Let's listen in.

FRED THOMPSON, FORMER U.S. SENATOR: How do you tell the story of a presidency? How do you tell the story so far? The story is in part, but inescapably the story of a man, which leads inescapably to the fact of who he is.

The great mystery of any presidency is that the sovereign people of these United States choose a leader and then only, afterwards, in the day by day, do they find out who that person really is. History reveals this. History throws you what it throws you, and you never know what's coming.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

THOMPSON: Some things about George Bush are well known, his lack of pretension, a sincerity both of action and purpose, a tendency toward candor. There's a sense of humor that is natural. He has even been known to kid around with folks.

But some things about him aren't well-known at all. When you know him and work with him, what you're struck by is not the secrets that you have to keep, but the truths you love to tell. He doesn't like to talk about them. But maybe when we look back at this era and this man, we will ask, what do a bullhorn and a baseball have in common? What truths can they tell? Which is another way of saying, what did George W. Bush do? Who did he become? And how did that help us?

Let me introduce you to 69-year-old Bob Beckwith with the New York City Fire Department. Retired, he volunteered to help at ground zero. And this was his first day on the job. He was clearing debris off a crushed fire truck when he was told that someone was coming.

BOB BECKWITH, FDNY VOLUNTEER: And then, all of a sudden, who comes around the side of the rig but the president. I said to myself, oh, my God. I helped him on to the rig. I said, are you OK, Mr. President? He said, I'm good.

I went to leave, and he said, where are you going? And I said, I was told to get off. He put his arm around me and said, no, you stay right with me.

GEORGE W. BUSH, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES: I can hear you. The rest of the world hears you, and the people... (CHEERING AND APPLAUSE)

BUSH: The people who knocked these buildings down will hear all of us soon.

(CHEERING AND APPLAUSE)

THOMPSON: Some things in history aren't planned. They can't be planned. You just try to rise to the occasion. Just about everybody did those days.

But a funny thing about George W. Bush. He was always trying to comfort everyone, and then he would always come back saying how inspired he had been by them.

Arlene Howard was at the Javits Center that day in New York when the president went to meet with the families. She had just lost her son, another man who had rushed to the fire. Mrs. Howard told the president she wanted to make sure what George Howard was and who he had been was never forgotten. So she gave the president of the United States her son's policeman's badge. George Bush took that badge and put it in his pocket.

And then he told the nation he would keep it with him to remember all who had lived so heroically. And to this day, Arlene Howard is his friend. He just rose to the occasion. Just about everybody did those days.

The president and the first lady had gone to Walter Reed Hospital to meet with soldiers wounded in Afghanistan. In ward 57, the president met Sergeant Mike McNaughton of the Louisiana National Guard, who had lost his right leg to a land mine.

When Sergeant McNaughton revealed that he had been an avid runner before he was wounded, the president told him, when you're better, come and run with me. So that's what he did.

SGT. MIKE MCNAUGHTON, LOUISIANA NATIONAL GUARD: We were waiting in the White House when he came around the corner. And he said, are you ready? And I said, Mr. President, I'm stretched. I'm ready to go. Let's go.

THOMPSON: They ran the track three times, three laps on the South Lawn and then they just hung out for a while.

It's hard for a picture to capture the presidency. But maybe a story can tell us something about its meaning. It was October 2001. America had just been hit and America was uneasy. And some were afraid. He knew. There was a baseball game, the World Series. And it was held in New York. New York was trying to come back. And he knew.

And, suddenly, the White House was calling the mayor's office, which was calling Yankee Stadium. It was the first night of the big series in New York. And look who arrived at Yankee Stadium. Derek Jeter bumped into him before he walked out to the mound, and he said, hey, Mr. President, where are you going to throw from? The president said, I hadn't thought about it. I guess the base of the mound.

And Derek Jeter said, this is New York. And in New York, you throw from the mound. And the president laughed. He was wearing a heavy Secret Service bulletproof vest and he could hardly move his arms. But he knew. So George Bush took the mound.

What he did that night, that man in the arena, he helped us come back. That's the story of this presidency. With the heart of a president, he told us, you keep pitching. No matter what, you keep pitching. No matter what, you go to the game. You go to the mound. You find the plate, and you throw, and you become who you are.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

(CHEERING AND APPLAUSE)

GEORGE W. BUSH, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES: Thank you all.

(APPLAUSE)

Mr. Chairman...

(APPLAUSE)

Mr. Chairman, delegates, fellow citizens, I'm honored by your support, and I accept your nomination for president of the United States.

(APPLAUSE)

When I said those words four years ago, none of us could have envisioned what these years would bring. In the heart of this great city, we saw tragedy arrive on a quiet morning. We saw the bravery of rescuers grow with danger. We learned of passengers on a doomed plane who died with a courage that frightened their killers.

(APPLAUSE)

We have seen a shaken economy rise to its feet. And we have seen Americans in uniform storming mountain strongholds and charging through sandstorms and liberating millions with acts of valor that would make the men of Normandy proud.

(APPLAUSE)

Since 2001, Americans have been given hills to climb and found the strength to climb them.

Now, because we have made the hard journey, we can see the valley below. Now, because we have faced challenges with resolve, we have historic goals within our reach and greatness in our future.

We will build a safer world and a more hopeful America, and nothing will hold us back.

(APPLAUSE) In the work we have done and the work we will do, I am fortunate to have a superb vice president.

(APPLAUSE)

I have counted on Dick Cheney's calm and steady judgment in difficult days, and I'm honored to have him at my side.

(APPLAUSE)

I am grateful to share my walk in life with Laura Bush.

(APPLAUSE)

Americans have come to see the goodness and kindness and strength I first saw 26 years ago, and we love our first lady.

(APPLAUSE)

I'm a fortunate father of two spirited, intelligent and lovely young women.

(APPLAUSE)

I'm blessed with a sister and brothers who are my closest friends.

(APPLAUSE)

And I will always be the proud and grateful son of George and Barbara Bush.

(APPLAUSE)

My father served eight years at the side of another great American, Ronald Reagan.

(APPLAUSE)

His spirit of optimism and good will and decency are in this hall and are in our hearts and will always define our party.

(APPLAUSE)

Two months from today, voters will make a choice based on the records we have built, the convictions we hold and the vision that guides us forward. A presidential election is a contest for the future. Tonight I will tell you where I stand, what I believe, and where I will lead this country in the next four years.

(APPLAUSE)

AUDIENCE: Four more years. Four more years.

I believe every child can learn and every school must teach, so we passed the most important federal education reform in history. Because we acted, children are making sustained progress in reading and math, America's schools are getting better, and nothing will hold us back.

(APPLAUSE)

I believe we have a moral responsibility to honor America's seniors, so I brought Republicans and Democrats together to strengthen Medicare. Now seniors are getting immediate help buying medicine. Soon every senior will be able to get prescription drug coverage, and nothing will hold us back.

(APPLAUSE)

I believe in the energy and innovative spirit of America's workers, entrepreneurs, farmers and ranchers, so we unleashed that energy with the largest tax relief in a generation.

(APPLAUSE)

Because we acted, our economy is growing again and creating jobs, and nothing will hold us back.

(APPLAUSE)

I believe the most solemn duty of the American president is to protect the American people. If America shows uncertainty or weakness in this decade, the world will drift toward tragedy.

This will not happen on my watch.

(APPLAUSE)

I am running for president with a clear and positive plan to build a safer world and a more hopeful America. I am running with a compassionate conservative philosophy: that government should help people improve their lives, not try to run their lives.

(APPLAUSE)

I believe this nation wants steady, consistent, principled leadership. And that is why, with your help, we will win this election.

(APPLAUSE)

The story of America is the story of expanding liberty, an ever- widening circle, constantly growing to reach further and include more.

Our nation's founding commitment is still our deepest commitment: In our world, and here at home, we will extend the frontiers of freedom.

(APPLAUSE)

The times in which we work and live are changing dramatically. The workers of our parents' generation typically had one job, one skill, one career, often with one company that provided health care and a pension. And most of those workers were men. Today, workers change jobs, even careers, many times during their lives. And in one of the most dramatic shifts our society has seen, two-thirds of all moms also work outside the home.

(APPLAUSE)

This changed world can be a time of great opportunity for all Americans to earn a better living, support your family, and have a rewarding career. And government must take your side.

Many of our most fundamental systems -- the tax code, health coverage, pension plans, worker training -- were created for the world of yesterday, not tomorrow. We will transform these systems so that all citizens are equipped, prepared, and thus truly free to make your own choices and pursue your own dreams.

(APPLAUSE)

My plan begins with providing the security and opportunity of a growing economy. We now compete in a global market that provides new buyers for our goods, but new competition for our workers. To create more jobs in America, America must be the best place in the world to do business.

(APPLAUSE)

To create jobs, my plan will encourage investment and expansion by restraining federal spending, reducing regulation and making the tax relief permanent.

(APPLAUSE)

To create jobs, we will make our country less dependent on foreign sources of energy.

(APPLAUSE)

To create jobs, we will expand trade and level the playing field to sell American goods and services across the globe.

(APPLAUSE)

And we must protect small-business owners and workers from the explosion of frivolous lawsuits that threaten jobs across our country.

(APPLAUSE)

Another drag on our economy is the current tax code, which is a complicated mess, filled with special interest loopholes, saddling our people with more than 6 billion hours of paperwork and headache every year. The American people deserve -- and our economic future demands -- a simpler, fairer, pro-growth system.

(APPLAUSE)

In a new term, I will lead a bipartisan effort to reform and simplify the federal tax code.

(APPLAUSE)

Another priority in a new term will be to help workers take advantage of the expanding economy to find better and higher-paying jobs. In this time of change, many workers want to go back to school to learn different or higher-level skills. So we will double the number of people served by our principal job training program and increase funding for community colleges.

(APPLAUSE)

I know that with the right skills, American workers can compete with anyone, anywhere in the world.

(APPLAUSE)

In this time of change, opportunity in some communities is more distant than in others. To stand with workers in poor communities and those that have lost manufacturing, textile, and other jobs, we will create American opportunity zones.

In these areas, we'll provide tax relief and other incentives to attract new business and improve housing and job training to bring hope and work throughout all of America.

(APPLAUSE)

As I've traveled the country, I've met many workers and small- business owners who have told me that they are worried they cannot afford health care. More than half of the uninsured are small- business employees and their families.

In a new term, we must allow small firms to join together to purchase insurance at the discounts available to big companies.

(APPLAUSE)

We will offer a tax credit to encourage small businesses and their employees to set up health savings accounts and provide direct help for low-income Americans to purchase them. These accounts give workers the security of insurance against major illness, the opportunity to save tax-free for routine health expenses, and the freedom of knowing you can take your account with you whenever you change jobs.

(APPLAUSE)

We will provide low-income Americans with better access to health care. In a new term, I will ensure every poor county in America has a community or rural health center.

(APPLAUSE)

As I have traveled our country, I've met too many good doctors, especially OB/GYNs, who are being forced out of practice because of the high cost of lawsuits.

To make health care more affordable and accessible, we must pass medical liability reform now.

(APPLAUSE)

And in all we do to improve health care in America, we will make sure that health decisions are made by doctors and patients, not by bureaucrats in Washington, D.C.

(APPLAUSE)

In this time of change, government must take the side of working families. In a new term we will change outdated labor laws to offer comp-time and flex-time. Our laws should never stand in the way of a more family-friendly workplace.

(APPLAUSE)

Another priority for a new term is to build an ownership society, because ownership brings security and dignity and independence.

Thanks to our policies, home ownership in America is at an all- time high.

(APPLAUSE)

Tonight we set a new goal: 7 million more affordable homes in the next 10 years, so more American families will be able to open the door and say, "Welcome to my home."

(APPLAUSE)

In an ownership society, more people will own their health plans and have the confidence of owning a piece of their retirement.

We'll always keep the promise of Social Security for our older workers.

With the huge baby boom generation approaching retirement, many of our children and grandchildren understandably worry whether Social Security will be there when they need it.

We must strengthen Social Security by allowing younger workers to save some of their taxes in a personal account, a nest egg you can call your own and government can never take away.

(APPLAUSE)

In all these proposals, we seek to provide not just a government program, but a path, a path to greater opportunity, more freedom and more control over your own life.

(APPLAUSE)

And the path begins with our youngest Americans. To build a more hopeful America, we must help our children reach as far as their vision and character can take them. Tonight, I remind every parent and every teacher, I say to every child: No matter what your circumstance, no matter where you live, your school will be the path to promise of America.

(APPLAUSE)

We are transforming our schools by raising standards and focusing on results. We are insisting on accountability, empowering parents and teachers, and making sure that local people are in charge of their schools.

(APPLAUSE)

By testing every child, we are identifying those who need help, and we're providing a record level of funding to get them that help. In northeast Georgia, Gainesville Elementary School is mostly Hispanic and 90 percent poor. And this year, 90 percent of its students passed state tests in reading and math.

(APPLAUSE)

The principal -- the principal expresses the philosophy of his school this way: "We don't focus on what we can't do at this school; we focus on what we can do. And we do whatever it takes to get kids across the finish line."

See, this principal is challenging the soft bigotry of low expectations.

(APPLAUSE)

And that is the spirit of our education reform and the commitment of our country: No dejaremos a ningun nino atras. We will leave no child behind.

(APPLAUSE)

We are making progress. We are making progress. And there is more to do.

In this time of change, most new jobs are filled by people with at least two years of college, yet only about one in four students gets there. In our high schools, we will fund early intervention programs to help students at risk. We will place a new focus on math and science.

As we make progress, we will require a rigorous exam before graduation. By raising performance in our high schools and expanding Pell Grants for low and middle income families, we will help more Americans start their career with a college diploma.

(APPLAUSE)

America's children must also have a healthy start in life. In a new term, we will lead an aggressive effort to enroll millions of poor children who are eligible but not signed up for the government's health insurance programs. We will not allow a lack of attention or information to stand between these children and the health care they need.

(APPLAUSE)

Anyone who wants more details on my agenda can find them online. The web address is not very imaginative, but it's easy to remember: georgewbush.com.

(APPLAUSE)

These changing times can be exciting times of expanded opportunity.

And here, you face a choice. My opponent's policies are dramatically different from ours.

Senator Kerry opposed Medicare reform and health savings accounts. After supporting my education reforms, he now wants to dilute them. He opposes legal and medical liability reform. He opposed reducing the marriage penalty, opposed doubling the child credit, opposed lowering income taxes for all who pay them.

AUDIENCE: Boooo.

Wait a minute, wait a minute.

To be fair, there are some things my opponent is for.

(LAUGHTER)

He's proposed more than $2 trillion in new federal spending so far, and that's a lot, even for a senator from Massachusetts.

(APPLAUSE)

And to pay for that spending, he is running on a platform of increasing taxes. And that's the kind of promise a politician usually keeps. His policies of tax and spend, of expanding government rather than expanding opportunity, are the politics of the past. We are on the path to the future, and we're not turning back.

(APPLAUSE)

AUDIENCE: Four more years. Four more years. Four more years.

In this world of change, some things do not change: the values we try to live by, the institutions that give our lives meaning and purpose. Our society rests on a foundation of responsibility and character and family commitment. Because family and work are sources of stability and dignity, I support welfare reform that strengthens family and requires work.

(APPLAUSE) Because a caring society will value its weakest members, we must make a place for the unborn child.

(APPLAUSE)

Because religious charities provide a safety net of mercy and compassion, our government must never discriminate against them.

(APPLAUSE)

Because the union of a man and woman deserves an honored place in our society, I support the protection of marriage against activist judges.

(APPLAUSE)

And I will continue to appoint federal judges who know the difference between personal opinion and the strict interpretation of the law.

(APPLAUSE)

My opponent recently announced that he is the candidate of "conservative values," which must have come as a surprise to a lot of his supporters.

(LAUGHTER)

Now, there are some problems with this claim. If you say the heart and soul of America is found in Hollywood, I'm afraid you are not the candidate of conservative values.

(APPLAUSE)

If you voted against the bipartisan Defense of Marriage Act, which President Clinton signed, you are not the candidate of conservative values.

(APPLAUSE)

If you gave a speech, as my opponent did, calling the Reagan presidency eight years of "moral darkness," then you may be a lot of things, but the candidate of conservative values is not one of them.

(APPLAUSE)

This election will also determine how America responds to the continuing danger of terrorism, and you know where I stand.

(APPLAUSE)

Three days after September the 11th, I stood where Americans died, in the ruins of the twin towers. Workers in hard hats were shouting to me, "Whatever it takes." A fellow grabbed me by the arm, and he said, "Do not let me down." Since that day, I wake up every morning thinking about how to better protect our country. I will never relent in defending America -- whatever it takes.

(APPLAUSE)

AUDIENCE: USA. USA. USA.

So we have fought the terrorists across the Earth, not for pride, not for power, but because the lives of our citizens are at stake. Our strategy is clear. We have tripled funding for homeland security and trained half a million first responders because we are determined to protect our homeland.

We are transforming our military and reforming and strengthening our intelligence services. We are staying on the offensive, striking terrorists abroad so we do not have to face them here at home.

(APPLAUSE)

And we are working to advance liberty in the broader Middle East, because freedom will bring a future of hope and the peace we all want. And we will prevail.

(APPLAUSE)

Our strategy is succeeding. Four years ago, Afghanistan was the home base of al Qaeda. Pakistan was a transit point for terrorist groups. Saudi Arabia was fertile ground for terrorist fund- raising. Libya was secretly pursuing nuclear weapons, Iraq was a gathering threat. And al Qaeda was largely unchallenged as it planned attacks.

(APPLAUSE)

Today, the government of a free Afghanistan is fighting terror. Pakistan is capturing terrorist leaders. Saudi Arabia is making raids and arrests. Libya is dismantling its weapons programs. The army of a free Iraq is fighting for freedom. And more than three-quarters of al Qaeda's key members and associates have been detained or killed.

(APPLAUSE)

We have led, many have joined, and America and the world are safer.

(APPLAUSE)

This progress involved careful diplomacy, clear moral purpose and some tough decisions.

And the toughest came on Iraq. We knew Saddam Hussein's record of aggression and support for terror. We knew his long history of pursuing, even using, weapons of mass destruction. And we know that September the 11th requires our country to think differently. We must, and we will, confront threats to America before it is too late.

(APPLAUSE)

In Saddam Hussein, we saw a threat. Members of both political parties, including...

AUDIENCE: USA. USA. USA.

Members of both political parties, including my opponent and his running mate, saw the threat, and voted to authorize the use of force. We went to the United Nations Security Council, which passed a unanimous resolution demanding the dictator disarm, or face serious consequences. Leaders in the Middle East urged him to comply.

After more than a decade of diplomacy, we gave Saddam Hussein another chance, a final chance, to meet his responsibilities to the civilized world. He again refused.

And I faced the kind of decision that comes only to the Oval Office, a decision no president would ask for, but must be prepared to make: Do I forget the lessons of September 11th and take the word of a madman...

AUDIENCE: No.

... or do I take action to defend our country?

Faced with that choice, I will defend America every time.

(APPLAUSE)

Because we acted to defend our country, the murderous regimes of Saddam Hussein and the Taliban are history, more than 50 million people have been liberated, and democracy is coming to the broader Middle East.

(APPLAUSE)

In Afghanistan, terrorists have done everything they can to intimidate people, yet more than 10 million citizens have registered to vote in the October presidential election, a resounding endorsement for democracy.

(APPLAUSE)

Despite ongoing acts of violence, Iraq now has a strong prime minister, a national council, and national elections are scheduled for January.

Our nation is standing with the people of Afghanistan and Iraq, because when America gives its word, America must keep its word.

(APPLAUSE)

As importantly, we are serving a vital and historic cause that will make our country safer. Free societies in the Middle East will be hopeful societies which no longer feed resentments and breed violence for export. Free governments in the Middle East will fight terrorists instead of harboring them. And that helps us keep the peace.

(APPLAUSE)

So our mission in Afghanistan and Iraq is clear. We will help new leaders to train their armies, and move toward elections, and get on the path of stability and democracy as quickly as possible. And then our troops will return home with the honor they have earned.

(APPLAUSE)

Our troops know the historic importance of our work. One Army specialist wrote home, "We are transforming a once-sick society into a hopeful place. The various terrorist enemies we are facing in Iraq," he continued, "are really aiming at you back in the United States. This is a test of will for our country. We soldiers of yours are doing great and scoring victories in confronting the evil terrorists." That young man is right. Our men and women in uniform are doing a superb job for America.

(APPLAUSE)

Tonight I want to speak to all of them and to their families: You are involved in a struggle of historic proportion. Because of your service and sacrifice, we are defeating the terrorists where they live and plan, and you're making America safer.

Because of you, women in Afghanistan are no longer shot in a sports stadium. Because of you, the people of Iraq no longer fear being executed and left in mass graves.

(APPLAUSE)

Because of you, the world is more just and will be more peaceful.

(APPLAUSE)

We owe you our thanks. And we owe you something more. We will give you all the resources, all the tools, and all the support you need for victory.

(APPLAUSE)

Again, my opponent and I have different approaches. I proposed, and the Congress overwhelmingly passed, $87 billion in funding needed by our troops doing battle in Afghanistan and Iraq. My opponent and his running mate voted against this money for bullets and fuel and vehicles and body armor.

AUDIENCE: Boo.

When asked to explain his vote, the senator said, "I actually did vote for the $87 billion, before I voted against it."

AUDIENCE: Flip-flop. Flip-flop. Flip-flop.

Then he said he was "proud" of his vote. Then, when pressed, he said it was a "complicated" matter.

There's nothing complicated about supporting our troops in combat.

(APPLAUSE)

Our allies also know the historic importance of our work. About 40 nations stand beside us in Afghanistan, and some 30 in Iraq. I deeply appreciate the courage and wise counsel of leaders like Prime Minister Howard, President Kwasniewski, Prime Minister Berlusconi and, of course, Prime Minister Tony Blair.

(APPLAUSE)

Again, my opponent takes a different approach. In the midst of war, he has called American allies, quote, a "coalition of the coerced and the bribed."

AUDIENCE: Boooo.

That would be nations like Great Britain, Poland, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Denmark, El Salvador, Australia, and others...

(APPLAUSE)

... allies that deserve the respect of all Americans, not the scorn of a politician.

(APPLAUSE)

I respect every soldier, from every country, who serves beside us in the hard work of history. America is grateful, and America will not forget.

(APPLAUSE)

The people we have freed won't forget either. Not long ago, seven Iraqi men came to see me in the Oval Office. They had Xs branded into their foreheads and their right hands had been cut off by Saddam Hussein's secret police, the sadistic punishment for imaginary crimes. During our emotional visit one of the Iraqi men used his new prosthetic hand to slowly write out, in Arabic, a prayer for God to bless America.

(APPLAUSE)

I am proud that our country remains the hope of the oppressed and the greatest force for good on this Earth.

(APPLAUSE)

Others understand the historic importance of our work. The terrorists know. They know that a vibrant, successful democracy at the heart of the Middle East will discredit their radical ideology of hate.

(APPLAUSE)

They know that men and women with hope and purpose and dignity do not strap bombs on their bodies and kill the innocent.

(APPLAUSE)

The terrorists are fighting freedom with all their cunning and cruelty because freedom is their greatest fear. And they should be afraid, because freedom is on the march.

(APPLAUSE)

I believe in the transformational power of liberty. The wisest use of American strength is to advance freedom.

As the citizens of Afghanistan and Iraq seize the moment, their example will send a message of hope throughout a vital region.

Palestinians will hear the message that democracy and reform are within their reach and so is peace with our good friend, Israel.

(APPLAUSE)

Young women across the Middle East will hear the message that their day of equality and justice is coming. Young men will hear the message that national progress and dignity are found in liberty, not tyranny and terror.

Reformers and political prisoners and exiles will hear the message that their dream of freedom cannot be denied forever. And as freedom advances, heart by heart, and nation by nation, America will be more secure and the world more peaceful.

(APPLAUSE)

America has done this kind of work before, and there have always been doubters. In 1946, 18 months after the fall of Berlin to allied forces, a journalist wrote in the New York Times wrote this: "Germany is a land in an acute stage of economic, political and moral crisis. European capitals are frightened. In every military headquarters, one meets alarmed officials doing their utmost to deal with the consequences of the occupation policy that they admit has failed," end quote.

Maybe that same person is still around, writing editorials.

(APPLAUSE)

Fortunately, we had a resolute president named Truman who, with the American people, persevered, knowing that a new democracy at the center of Europe would lead to stability and peace. And because that generation of Americans held firm in the cause of liberty, we live in a better and safer world today.

(APPLAUSE)

The progress we and our friends and allies seek in the broader Middle East will not come easily or all at once. Yet Americans, of all people, should never be surprised by the power of liberty to transform lives and nations. That power brought settlers on perilous journeys, inspired colonies to rebellion, ended the sin of slavery, and set our nation against the tyrannies of the 20th century.

We were honored to aid the rise of democracy in Germany and Japan, Nicaragua and Central Europe and the Baltics, and that noble story goes on.

I believe that America is called to lead the cause of freedom in a new century. I believe that millions in the Middle East plead in silence for their liberty. I believe that given the chance, they will embrace the most honorable form of government ever devised by man.

I believe all these things because freedom is not America's gift to the world; it is the almighty God's gift to every man and woman in this world.

(APPLAUSE)

This moment in the life of our country will be remembered. Generations will know if we kept our faith and kept our word. Generations will know if we seized this moment and used it to build a future of safety and peace. The freedom of many and the future security of our nation now depend on us.

And tonight, my fellow Americans, I ask you to stand with me.

(APPLAUSE)

In the last four years -- in the last four years, you and I have come to know each other. Even when we don't agree, at least you know what I believe and where I stand.

(APPLAUSE)

You may have noticed I have a few flaws, too. People sometimes have to correct my English.

(LAUGHTER)

I knew I had a problem when Arnold Schwarzenegger started doing it.

(LAUGHTER)

Some folks look at me and see a certain swagger, which in Texas is called "walking."

(LAUGHTER)

(APPLAUSE)

Now and then I come across as a little too blunt, and for that we can all thank the white-haired lady sitting right up there.

(LAUGHTER)

(APPLAUSE)

One thing I have learned about the presidency is that whatever shortcomings you have, people are going to notice them; and whatever strengths you have, you're going to need them.

(APPLAUSE)

These four years have brought moments I could not foresee and will not forget. I've tried to comfort Americans who lost the most on September the 11th: people who showed me a picture or told me a story so I would know how much was taken from them.

I have learned first-hand that ordering Americans into battle is the hardest decision even when it is right. I have returned the salute of wounded soldiers, some with a very tough road ahead, who say they were just doing their job. I've held the children of the fallen who are told their dad or mom is a hero, but would rather just have their dad or mom.

I've met with parents and wives and husbands who have received a folded flag and said a final goodbye to a soldier they loved. I am awed that so many have used those meetings to say that I am in their prayers and to offer encouragement to me.

Where does that strength like that come from? How can people so burdened with sorrow also feel such pride? It is because they know their loved one was last seen doing good because they know that liberty was precious to the one they lost. And in those military families, I have seen the character of a great nation: decent and idealistic and strong.

The world saw that spirit three miles from here, when the people of this city faced peril together and lifted a flag over the ruins and defied the enemy with their courage.

My fellow Americans, for as long as our country stands, people will look to the resurrection of New York City and they will say: Here buildings fell, and here a nation rose.

(APPLAUSE)

We see America's character in our military, which finds a way or makes one. We see it in our veterans, who are supporting military families in their days of worry. We see it in our young people, who have found heroes once again.

We see that character in workers and entrepreneurs, who are renewing our economy with their effort and optimism.

And all of this has confirmed one belief beyond doubt: Having come this far, our tested and confident nation can achieve anything.

(APPLAUSE)

To everything we know there is a season -- a time for sadness, a time for struggle, a time for rebuilding. And now we have reached a time for hope. This young century will be liberty's century.

(APPLAUSE)

By promoting liberty abroad, we will build a safer world. By encouraging liberty at home, we will build a more hopeful America.

Like generations before us, we have a calling from beyond the stars to stand for freedom. This is the everlasting dream of America. And tonight, in this place, that dream is renewed.

(APPLAUSE)

Now we go forward, grateful for our freedom, faithful to our cause, and confident in the future of the greatest nation on Earth.

May God bless you, and may God continue to bless our great country.

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