Opinion

Refugees line up for food distributions by the UN in a refuge camp that opened after the 7.0 earthquake rocked Haiti in Port au Prince on January 29, 2010. (Photo by Nadav Neuhaus/Corbis via Getty Images)

If Trump can change his mind on hunting, why not on Haiti?

By Peniel Joseph
The Trump administration's decision to end Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Haiti, originally granted through a humanitarian program begun under the administration of Republican President George Herbert Walker Bush in 1990, is morally reprehensible. Almost 60,000 Haitians relocated to the United States in the aftermath of 2010's devastating earthquake -- a natural disaster that left thousands dead, and crippled the island's transportation and material infrastructure. Now the Department of Homeland Security has ordered that they have to leave by July 2019 (or else face deportation if they do not, as John Kelly suggested in May, find another way to apply to stay in the United States).
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Sexual misconduct affects hollywood

Are men really clueless about sexual harassment?

By Peggy Drexler
Setting aside the flat-out predators, some men let their confusion about gender roles override their intellect and their knowledge of what is wrong and what is right. That's no longer an excuse, writes Peggy Drexler.
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trump turkey pardon moos pkg erin_00002010.jpg

What Trump can learn about giving thanks

By Jay Parini
The President's demand for thanks from UCLA players is breathtakingly immature, writes Jay Parini, but it forces larger question at a time when Americans stop and ponder: What does it mean to give thanks?
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Value your constitutional rights? Thank a journalist

By RonNell Andersen Jones
The modern news media has repeatedly and vigorously waged open-government crusades -- for all of us. If the traditional press's decline leaves it without the resources to keep doing this, our First Amendment rights will suffer, writes RonNell Andersen Jones.

How Sarah Sanders humiliated the press

By John Kirby, CNN National Security Analyst
At Monday's daily press briefing, White House press secretary Sarah Sanders encouraged reporters to first state things they were thankful for before asking their questions. Most of them obliged. They shouldn't have.

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    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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      QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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    The most important number you've never heard of

    By John D. Sutter, CNN
    If the world warms more than 2 degrees Celsius, we're all in a lot of trouble. See how you can get involved below.

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