Opinion

Bill Nye March for Science

Bill Nye: Science made America great

By Bill Nye
The US has become the most powerful nation on Earth and among the greatest in history, because it has long respected and promoted science. Science is being actively undermined by ideological forces motivated to maintain the status quo rather than advance the nation's long-term interest, says Bill Nye.
2 h
March for Science participant holds sign

Why I'm marching

By Don Lincoln
Don Lincoln: Science isn't a body of knowledge. It's a process. The scientific method is the most powerful method ever devised for getting at the truth of how the world around us works.
US President Donald Trump speaks alongside Italian Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni (L) during a press conference in the East Room at the White House in Washington, DC, April 20, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB        (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

100 days of failure for Trump?

By Julian Zelizer
President Donald Trump doesn't care what the experts have to say. "No matter how much I accomplish during the ridiculous standard of the first 100 days, & it has been a lot (including S.C.), media will kill!," he tweeted.
US Vice President Mike Pence (L) listens to Indonesian President Joko Widodo during their meeting at Merdeka Palace in Jakarta on April 20, 2017. 
Pence to visit the largest mosque in Indonesia -- the world's most populous Muslim-majority nation -- a symbolic gesture for the deputy in an administration accused of stoking Islamophobia / AFP PHOTO / POOL / BEAWIHARTA        (Photo credit should read BEAWIHARTA/AFP/Getty Images)

How US, Indonesia can both win from strengthening ties

By Mari Pangestu
The penultimate stop on US Vice President Mike Pence's tour to Asia was to Indonesia, a strategic move that should send positive signs about the Trump administration's engagement to trade in the region.
Here are new pictures of suspect Tad Cummins, captured the week prior to the kidnapping of Elizabeth Thomas.

How the adults failed Tennessee teen girl

By Peggy Drexler
Community from which teen went missing could have done more to prevent her disappearance with teacher by acting more quickly to remove him, and--as all schools should--educating students and adults about what constitutes sexual assault, writes Peggy Drexler.
Members of the scientific community, environmental advocates, and supporters demonstrate Sunday, Feb. 19, 2017, in Boston, to call attention to what they say are the increasing threats to science and scientific research under the administration of President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

Scientists won't win until they run

By Shaughnessy Naughton
The March for Science takes place this Saturday, the 47th anniversary of the first Earth Day. Tens of thousands of activists will unite on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. and they will present one overriding request to the nation and its elected leaders: Facts must inform public policy.
AKW3H3 The set of star wars film in the desert near Tozeur Tunisia

The 'Star Wars' about to become reality

By Amin Al-Habaibeh, The Conversation
In Star Wars, Luke's family obtained water in the desert by farming it from the air with fictional "vaporators." But could they work in the real world?
MADRID, SPAIN - 2016/02/06: Women protesting during the International Day against female genital mutilation . (Photo by Marcos del Mazo/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Female genital mutilation is also a US issue

By Jessica Neuwirth
Jumana Nagarwala, a 44-year-old emergency room doctor at a Detroit hospital, was denied bail earlier this week and remains in custody, awaiting trial, charged with performing female genital mutilation (FGM) in the United States -- which happens here more often than you think.
HARBEL, LIBERIA - AUGUST 24:  Workers unload medical supplies to fight the Ebola epidemic from a USAID cargo flight on August 24, 2014 in Harbel, Liberia. The U.S. government sent more than 16 tons of supplies, including anti-contamination clothing (PPE), plasting sheeting and water purification machinery. International aid agencies and the Liberian government are struggling to keep up with the rapidly-expanding epidemic. The deadly virus has killed at least 1,400 people in West Africa and more in Liberia than any other country.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

Melinda Gates: The best investment America can make

By Melinda Gates
It would be a huge mistake for the Trump administration to cut US humanitarian aid, which heads off epidemics, has outsize effect on stemming poverty and extremism--for less than1% of the federal budget.
US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson talks with Russian Foreign Minister (unseen) during their meeting in Moscow on April 12, 2017.  
Tillerson meets Lavrov as Washington confronts Moscow about its support for the Syrian regime. / AFP PHOTO / Alexander NEMENOV        (Photo credit should read ALEXANDER NEMENOV/AFP/Getty Images)

Huge mistake if Trump undoes Iran deal

By John Kirby
After his campaign promise that he would "rip up" the agreement, it must have galled Donald Trump for his administration to certify to Congress that Iran is meeting its obligations under the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, otherwise known as the Iran nuclear deal. That's probably why, in the certification letter Secretary of State Rex Tillerson sent to Congress this week, he added that little bit about the administration's review of the deal and the possibility of revisiting the nuclear-related sanctions the United States lifted to secure it.
Judge Gonzalo P. Curiel and President Donnald Trump

Will Curiel's case be a test for Trump?

By Raul A. Reyes
How the US handles a murky case on a DACA recipient's deportation could shed light on Trump and Sessions' confusing and ominous agenda on immigration.

Thank women for O'Reilly's downfall

By Issac Bailey
Make no mistake -- women are responsible for Bill O'Reilly's downfall, but without male allies, they will continue to be the victims of sexism and sexual harassment in the workplace, writes Issac Bailey.

How to cut the price of prescription drugs

By Scott W. Atlas
If the new FDA director wants to reduce health care costs, he should promote policies that increase drug competition, remove unnecessary regulations and eliminate taxes that are ultimately passed on to consumers, Scott Atlas writes
NORTH ATTLEBORO, MA - AUGUST 22: Aaron Hernandez sits in the courtroom of the Attleboro District Court during his hearing on August 22, 2013 in North Attleboro, Massachusetts. Former New England Patriot Aaron Hernandez has been indicted on a first-degree murder charge for the death of Odin Lloyd. (Photo by Jared Wickerham/Getty Images)

Aaron Hernandez was a troubled man, not a monster

By Roxanne Jones
Former New England Patriots star and convicted killer Aaron Hernandez is dead today. While some of his former teammates visited the White House Wednesday to celebrate their most recent Super Bowl victory, the Twitterverse has been quick to throw stones and crack jokes about him getting what he deserves. But I see nothing righteous or funny about his story:
MARIETTA, GA - APRIL 18:  Democratic candidate Jon Ossoff speaks with the media at a campaign office as he runs for Georgia's 6th Congressional District on April 18, 2017 in Marietta, Georgia. Ossoff is running in a special election to replace Tom Price, who is now the Secretary of Health and Human Services. Today's election will fill a congressional seat that has been held by a Republican since the 1970s.  (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

How Georgia vote shows Trump not so invincible

By Tim Naftali
Jon Ossoff thrashed all of his opponents in the special election in Georgia's 6th congressional district Tuesday night, and though he fell short of the 50% plus one needed to avoid a June runoff, will go into that runoff as the favorite.
united flight passenger video after incident john klaassen intv ctn_00003430.jpg

Pilot: Stop blaming United

By Les Abend
Les Abend explains that United isn't entirely to blame for its recent passenger fiasco. Much of the fault lies with Chicago airport security, which decided to use phyiscal force to remove Dr. David Dao.
PALM SPRINGS, CA - MAY 13:  Giant wind turbines are powered by strong prevailing winds on May 13, 2008 near Palm Springs, California. A US government report released this week concludes that wind energy could generate 20 percent of the electricity produced in the US by 2030, as much as is currently provided by nuclear reactors. Although wind energy constitutes only about 1 percent of the electricity of the nation, wind energy is experiencing a growth spurt with an increase of 45 percent jump last year. The report envisions more than 75,000 new wind turbines, many of them bigger than those in use today, and many of them in offshore waters to increase production from the current 16,000 megawatts of power to 300,000 megawatts. The report does not predict that such growth will actually occur but rather that it is possible.  (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

What America's workers know about climate change

By George Gresham and Bill McKibben
The climate crisis threatens health, jobs, prosperity, and security of Americas workers and everyone else, write George Gresham and Bill McKibben. Citizens should march April 29th for a better future.
Steve Stephens

The other victim in Facebook killer's crime

By Jill Filipovic
Facebook killer made victim say name of woman he blamed for making him kill, a tactic we've seen from misogynist killer before. By publicly naming her too, media abets him in debasing her

Could 'Fearless Girl' defeat 'Charging Bull'?

By Paul Callan
Last week, Arthur Modica, the 76-year-old sculptor of Wall Street's ferocious "Charging Bull," demanded the city of New York remove the "Fearless Girl" sculpture currently obstructing the flow of testosterone toward Wall Street. Modica's lawyer claims both his reputation and his work of art have been severely damaged by the city's decision to permit placement of the bronze little girl near the 18-foot-long bronze bull.
Trump tracker paris climate agreement_00001005.jpg

How Trump could make US a climate pariah over Paris pact

By Jeffrey Sachs
With the transition to a low-carbon economy far underway, If Trump actually pulls out of Paris agreement, he will confirm for the world, in a single move, that America has indeed elected an incompetent President, writes Jeffrey Sachs.
A supporter of the "yes" brandishes a picture of Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan among other supporters waving Turkish national flags during a rally near the headquarters of the conservative Justice and Development Party on April 16, 2017 in Istanbul after the initial results of a nationwide referendum that will determine Turkey's future destiny.

Turkey's democracy died today

By Frida Ghitis
As Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan declares victory in Sunday's referendum, Frida Ghitis writes that the country will now become less democratic and more bitterly divided than ever.

Make it a crime to show killing on Facebook

By Danny Cevallos, CNN Legal Analyst
Certain sorts of depraved killers have long sought media spotlight, and now the internet provides a huge one. We need laws to deter this--to criminalize the criminal's act of broadcasting his crime.
U.S. President Donald Trump walks on the South Lawn after returning to the White House in April 9, 2017 in Washington, DC.

Will Trump's base stick with him?

By Alice Stewart
Alice Stewart says the idea that the base will abandon Trump for changing his stances is simplistic; parts of the base are very happy with him, others are taking a wait and see attitude
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 11: US President Donald Trump speaks during a strategic and policy discussion with CEOs in the State Department Library in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building (EEOB) on April 11, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images)

Democratic hypocrisy on war power

By Julian Zelizer
Julian Zelizer says Democrats who protest the administration's actions in Syria should remember that presidents of their party also acted unilaterally
This March 29, 2010, photo shows Michelle Thurschwell, left, and Stacey Light making faces as they partake in parsley and salt water at a traditional Passover Seder dinner at the Hillel House in Athens, Georgia. The parsley symbolizes spring and the salt water symbolizes the tears shed during Egyptian slavery.

I'm a millennial 'none,' but I still want Easter

By Jill Filipovic
Many millennials are non-believers who have dropped the religious affiliation, but still crave community, kinship and meal with friends at holidays like Passover and Easter, writes Jill Filipovic.

The robot scabs are coming to take your jobs

By Don Howard
If you live in a developed or rapidly developing nation, you and your children will grow old in a world in which most people will not work, because the robots will take your jobs, writes Don Howard
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 11: US President Donald Trump speaks during a strategic and policy discussion with CEOs in the State Department Library in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building (EEOB) on April 11, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images)

Trump bombings The Mother of All Distractions?

By William D. Hartung
The US's two high-profile bombings seem less like a strategy than a series of erratic outbursts likely to do the country and global security more harm than good, says William Hartung. Congress and Americans need to know the plan.
UNITED STATES - APRIL 13: People passing through DuPont Circle stop to have their photo taken with "Donny the Tax March Chicken" on Thursday, April 13, 2017, two days before the Tax March in Washington. The Tax March is being held to call on President Donald Trump to release his tax returns. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

We the people do care about Trump's taxes

By Lisa Gilbert
On April 15, many Americans will march, sending a clear message to President Trump and those of his tax bracket -- we want a more open and transparent system, one which does not privilege the wealthy over the working class, writes Lisa Gilbert.
moab bomb afghanistan isis starr dnt lead_00012608.jpg

Why the 'mother of all bombs' and why now?

By Peter Bergen, CNN National Security Analyst
Peter Bergen says the use of the bomb should be understood as part of an effort to reverse a war that is not going well for the Afghan government and, by extension, the United States.

Axelrod: Putin and Trump, fake news bros

By David Axelrod, CNN Senior Political Commentator
A president under siege unleashes a wholly unproven and outrageous charge and assails the US intelligence community for spreading false, politically-motivated findings.
The statue of Martin Luther King Jr. is pictured at a memorial on August 24, 2103, in Washington, DC, as thousands of people gather to commemorate the 50th anniversary of The March on Washington. Tens of thousands gathered on August 24 to mark 50 years since the March on Washington, the civil rights watershed where Martin Luther King Jr famously declared: 'I have a dream.' The March on Washington is best remembered for King's stirring vision of a United States free of inequality and prejudice, telecast live to a nation undergoing a phenomenal  decade of soul-searching, crisis and change. AFP Photo/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)

Why I compared Trump to Martin Luther King

By Jeffrey Lord
Whether he knows it or not, says Jeffrey Lord, Donald Trump is pursuing a similar strategy to one Martin Luther King, Jr. used very effectively in the 1960s.
DALLAS, TX - SEPTEMBER 14:  Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at the American Airlines Center on September 14, 2015 in Dallas, Texas. More than 20,000 tickets have been distributed for the event.  (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)

Our Jekyll and Hyde President

By Frida Ghitis
Trump's 180's on China, Syria, Russia, NATO reflect an erratic foreign policy apparently guided by the evening news and the abandonment of absurd campaign vows that could not survive the first contact with reality.
President Donald Trump speaks at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla., Thursday, April 6, 2017, after the U.S. fired a barrage of cruise missiles into Syria Thursday night in retaliation for this week's gruesome chemical weapons attack against civilians. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Donald Trump's big test

By Danielle Pletka
Obama chose to punt on Syria, and unless Trump comes up with a strategy beyond last week's airstrikes and his failed pressuring of Russia, he too will have no effect.
President Donald Trump speaks on the phone with Russian President Vladimir Putin in the Oval Office of the White House, January 28, 2017 in Washington, DC.

Where Trump's White House shake-up should begin

By David Gergen, CNN Senior Political Analyst
As President Trump weighs a White House staff shake-up, he needs to embrace an idea central to any organization -- change starts from within, writes David Gergen.
trump assad butcher nato presser sot_00004404.jpg

Trump should be fighting ISIS, not Syria

By Ivan Eland
US doesn't need a bigger entanglement in a non-strategic country, or escalation with a nuclear-armed power on the same battlefield. It should focus on America's main mission—the fight against ISIS, writes Ivan Eland.. .

I got bumped from a flight. Then I sued

By Thatcher A. Stone
Aviation lawyer Thatcher Stone says the United story has two lessons: passengers must follow instructions of flight crews and airlines need to follow the rules on bumping

Can coding the brain save or destroy us?

By Ed Finn
The announcement of Elon Musk's newest foray into the future, Neuralink, opens up a new chapter in one of humanity's long-running dreams. What Neuralink proposes (and narratives like the recently-rebooted "Ghost in the Shell" have explored for decades) is a world in which the mind can be edited like software, changing memories, beliefs or personalities at the stroke of a keyboard. But we've learned a lesson from the thickening layer of computation in our lives, turning every toaster and toothbrush into a "smart" device: be careful what you wish for in networked intelligence.

MUST WATCH

Political Op-eds 

Social commentary 

  • Steve King babies 2

    Steve King, racism will fail

    By Ruth Ben-Ghiat
    Ruth Ben-Ghiat says that Steve King's tweets neglect the lesson -- evident from the Jim Crow South to Fascist Europe to apartheid South Africa -- that states organized around racism are doomed to fail.

Start Sunday Smarter 

Two° 

    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

      JUST WATCHED

      QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

    MUST WATCH

    The most important number you've never heard of

    By John D. Sutter, CNN
    If the world warms more than 2 degrees Celsius, we're all in a lot of trouble. See how you can get involved below.

          In Case You Missed It