Opinion

An investment that's a safer bet than Social Security

By Kent Smetters
Wharton professor Kent Smetters says there's one financial bet people should make before the end of the year: buy I-Bonds, which protect you against inflation, are backed by the full faith and credit of the US and don't carry the heavy fees of many annuities sold by financial advisors.
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How to stand up against hate

By Emily May and Kio Stark
It isn't easy, write Emily May and Kio Stark, but being a better bystander can change the world. The key is knowing that you have options and using them.
Police secure the scene near Comet Ping Pong in Washington, Sunday, Dec. 4, 2016. A man who said he was investigating a conspiracy theory about Hillary Clinton running a child sex ring out of the pizza place fired an assault rifle inside the restaurant on Sunday injuring no one, police and news reports said. (Photo by Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post via AP)

Fake news is domestic terrorism

By Cedric L. Alexander
Pizzagate shooting shows irresponsible sharing of fake news can have the same effects as ISIS: using the internet to erode national allegiances, says Cedric L. Alexander.
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Challenge white supremacist on campus

By John McWhorter
It's important that Texas A&M is rejecting Richard Spencer's racism, writes John McWhorter, but it would be even better if they challenged his ideas directly.
This still, released by the family of Walter Scott, appears to show North Charleston, South Carolina police officer Michael Slager shooting Scott in the back as he ran away from the officer. The incident took place Saturday, April 4, 2015.

Double jeopardy won't protect Michael Slager

By Danny Cevallos, CNN Legal Analyst
Danny Cevallos writes that double jeopardy will not save Michael Slager, the former Charleston police officer accused of murdering Walter Scott, from at least two additional trials -- one state and one federal.

What Trump is telling company bosses

By James Pethokoukis
Donald Trump's direct interference in and tax threats against individual companies sets a dangerous -- and costly -- precedent, writes AEI's James Pethokoukis.
(L to R) President-elect Donald Trump welcomes retired United States Marine Corps general James Mattis as they pose for a photo before their meeting at Trump International Golf Club, November 19, 2016 in Bedminster Township, New Jersey.

Mattis can stand up to Trump

By Benjamin Haas
Mad Dog Mattis will be able to use his personality to guide (and stand up to) Donald Trump as Secretary of Defense, writes former Army Intelligence officer Benjamim Haas.
BOULDER, CO - OCTOBER 28:  Presidential candidates Donald Trump (L) and Ben Carson look on during  the CNBC Republican Presidential Debate at University of Colorados Coors Events Center October 28, 2015 in Boulder, Colorado.  Fourteen Republican presidential candidates are participating in the third set of Republican presidential debates.  (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Ben Carson is totally unqualified to be HUD Secretary

By Issac Bailey
It makes little sense to hire a man who doesn't really believe government can be a force for good to head an important government agency, particularly one so vital to Americans who live in poverty, writes Issac Bailey
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Sue over fake news? Not so fast

By Paul Callan
Americans pay a price for the freedom that makes stories like "Pizzagate" possible, but it is a price worth paying, writes Paul Callan.

Should Democrats cooperate with Trump?

By Julian Zelizer
Julian Zelizer writes that if Democrats are serious about rejecting bigotry, they cannot cut deals with Donald Trump, whose presidential campaign was partially premised on xenophobia and sexism.
PHNOM PENH, CAMBODIA - NOVEMBER 09:  A Democratic supporter cries after Donald Trump's victory is announced on November 9, 2016 in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Dozens of expatriated Democratic Party supporters gathered starting early in the morning at a restaurant in central Phnom Penh to follow the results of the 2016 US Presidential elections at a party organized by Democrats Abroad Cambodia. Cambodia is 12 hours ahead of the US East Coast.  Approximately 3,000 Americans live in the capital Phnom Penh. (Photo by Omar Havana/Getty Images)

Where liberals will run to hide from Trump

By Andre Spicer
Like Nixon's, Donald Trump's election will make more liberals obsessed with self-development, but it could lead to narcissistic behavior, writes Andre Spicer.
US President-elect Donald Trump leaves a meeting with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell at the Capitol in Washington, DC, on November 10, 2016.

Keys to a successful Trump transition

By Sharon Marcil and Meldon Wolfgang
After nearly 18 months of campaigning, President-elect Donald Trump has a little more than 60 days to prepare to take the helm of one of the largest entities in the world: the US government. Considering the scale and complexity of the task, every hour counts.

Ditch the electoral college? It's easy

By Charles Kaiser
The quick adoption of the popular vote-based model for presidential elections could produce new faith in the future of American democracy, writes Charles Kaiser.
Donald Trump holds a media conference announcing the establishment of Trump University on May 23, 2005, in New York City.

The judge who saved Donald Trump

By George Shepherd
Donald Trump's attacks on Gonzalo Curiel are ironic, writes George Shepherd. One of the judge's rulings was probably crucial in helping Trump become president.

How to restore faith in US democracy

By Charles Kaiser
The quick adoption of the popular vote-based model for presidential elections could produce new faith in the future of American democracy, writes Charles Kaiser.
OAKLAND, CA - DECEMBER 03: Firefighters work on the scene following an overnight fire that claimed the lives of at least nine people at a warehouse in the Fruitvale neighborhood on December 3, 2016 in Oakland, California. The warehouse was hosting an electronic music party.  (Photo by Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images)

Why to embrace "nanny state" after Oakland fire

By Juliette Kayyem, CNN National Security Analyst
Regulations exist for a reason, writes Juliette Kayyem. They didn't fail in Oakland; rather, "regulations remind us of what is, and isn't, acceptable behavior."
BEDMINSTER TOWNSHIP, NJ - NOVEMBER 20: President-elect Donald Trump waves as he arrives at Trump International Golf Club for a day of meetings, November 20, 2016 in Bedminster Township, New Jersey. Trump and his transition team are in the process of filling cabinet and other high level positions for the new administration.  (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

How Trump should use Twitter

By Julian Zelizer
Twitter can create a sense of intimacy to engage citizens with politics, but Trump has already demonstrated the destructive paths this tool could take, writes Julian Zelizer. He needs some rules.
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How China could respond to Trump call

By Michael Auslin
It is time to stop debating the wisdom of Trump's call with Taiwan's president, and prepare for what China's coming response might be, says Michael Auslin.
FILE - In this June 1, 2016, file photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump wears his "Make America Great Again" hat at a rally in Sacramento, Calif. Trump's "Make America Great Again" hats proudly tout they are "Made in USA." Not necessarily always the case, an Associated Press review found. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)

What to expect from Washington under Trump

By David M. Smick
After several decades of policy stalemate in Washington, GOP control over Congress and the White House could bring significant change, writes David M. Smick

10 minutes that could change US-China history

The 10-minute conversation between US President-elect Donald Trump and Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen was a major break in the accepted protocol -- something that evidently does not much bother Mr. Trump. It is, of course, too soon to guess whether it was a fluke or a portent of a sea change in American policy.

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    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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      QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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    The most important number you've never heard of

    By John D. Sutter, CNN
    If the world warms more than 2 degrees Celsius, we're all in a lot of trouble. See how you can get involved below.

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