Opinion

A photo shows the Congress Centre on the eve of the opening day of the World Economic Forum, on January 16, 2017 in Davos.
Inequality will be among the issues topping the agenda as the world's political and business elite meet in Davos from January 17 to 20, when 3,000 people will gather for the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum.  / AFP / FABRICE COFFRINI        (Photo credit should read FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images)

Nobel economist: One-percenters, pay your taxes

By Joseph E. Stiglitz
Oxfam report reveals that eight men have as much wealth as half the world. Corporations must confront this moral failure with some basic steps that will workers and build prosperity for all in the process, writes Joseph Stiglitz.
MIAMI, FL - FEBRUARY 05: Pedro Rojas holds a sign directing people to an insurance company where they can sign up for the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, before the February 15th deadline on February 5, 2015 in Miami, Florida. Numbers released by the government show that the Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach metropolitan area has signed up 637,514 consumers so far since open enrollment began on Nov. 15, which is more than twice as many as the next large metropolitan area, Atlanta, Georgia.

Obamacare saved my life. What now?

By Xeni Jardin
I was lying in bed with my dog, recovering from my most recent surgery, when a news alert went off on my iPhone after midnight.
President-elect Donald Trump speaks to reporters at Trump Tower on January 13, 2017, in New York City.

Is the Christopher Steele dossier fake news?

By Nick Dowling
Donald Trump has called the Christopher Steele dossier "fake news" and "phony stuff," but is it? Nick Dowling says the material may or may not be true, but we can't dismiss it lightly
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. arrives in Alabama's state capital at the end of the Selma-to-Montgomery march a few weeks after "Bloody Sunday." The Selma campaign is widely considered King's greatest victory.

What MLK might say to Donald Trump

By Peniel Joseph
Donald Trump's critique of civil rights icon John Lewis, says Peniel Joseph, reminds us that Martin Luther King Jr. believed that justice was what love looked like in public.
US President-elect Donald Trump waves to the crowd as he exits the elevators to speak with media at Trump Tower on December 6, 2016 in New York. / AFP / Eduardo Munoz Alvarez        (Photo credit should read EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump is following the authoritarian playbook

By Ruth Ben-Ghiat
From stifling of press to rewriting history to discrediting justices who object to extra-legal practices, Trump's record bodes ill for the country and demands a vigorous push-back from citizens, writes historian Ruth Ben-Ghiat.
In this Jan. 5, 2017, photo, a painting by David Pulphus hangs in a hallway displaying paintings by high school students selected by their member of congress on Capitol Hill in Washington.

How controversial Capitol painting can show us who we are

By Seph Rodney
Why is a painting by a high school student the object of a tug-of-war between rival factions of the 115th Congress? The painting ended up in this fracas after it won Democratic Representative William Clay's congressional art competition last May.
MANAUS, BRAZIL - FEBRUARY 18:  An inmate is escorted through the overcrowded Puraquequara prison on February 18, 2016 in Manaus, Brazil. The prison holds nearly 1,400 inmates, around twice as many as it was designed for. Brazil now holds the fourth-largest prison population in the world, behind the U.S., Russia and China, with the number of Brazilians behind bars nearly doubling in the past decade. The prison system currently holds more than 600,000 inmates, 61 percent over capacity, according to Human Rights Watch.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Violent crime in your city? More cops are not enough

By Michael A. Nutter
"Law and order' alone won't have a real effect on urban violence, says Michael Nutter; for that we'll need buy-in educators and researchers, philanthropists, public officials and business leaders.
U.S. Army soldiers are welcomed in Zagan, Poland, Thursday, January 12, 2017. U.S. troops arrived at the Zagan base in western Poland as part of deterrence force of some 1,000 troops to be based here and reassure Poland that is worried about Russia's activity.

More US troops in Europe -- a timely move

By Mark Hertling
Retired Lt. Gen. Mark Hertling says the idea of rotating a brigade to eastern Europe, while long in the planning stages, is needed at this time to make clear the US defends its alliances
President Barack Obama hugs Vice President Joe Biden after giving his presidential farewell address at McCormick Place in Chicago, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

The week that Obama and Biden cried

By Shai Held
It's been a rough week for America, but it's been a good week for masculinity. No, not because we had to endure another display of Donald Trump's bellicose machismo, but because we witnessed two of the most powerful men in the world allow themselves to shed tears in public.

Dylann Roof is evil. Don't kill him

By Jill Filipovic
Sentenced to death in murder of 9, Roof neither wants nor deserves mercy. But the power of the state to kill as payback is simply too great to entrust to an imperfect system.
Protestors from CodePink, including co-founder Medea Benjamin take part in a demonstration on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017, during Senate Judiciary Committee's confirmation hearing for Attorney General-designate, Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Heed Coretta Scott King's warning on Sessions

By Sherrilyn Ifill
The Senate vote on Senator Sessions will speak volumes about what the most vulnerable groups in our society can expect from our elected leaders in the coming years, says Sherrilyn Ifill
Martin Luther King Jr. waves to supporters from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 1963, during the march on Washington, when King delivered his famous "I Have a Dream" speech.

How to honor MLK legacy in Whitefish, Montana

By Kenneth Stern
The Daily Stormer, a website led by neo-Nazi Andrew Anglin, recently announced a plan to march heavily armed in Whitefish, Montana -- hometown of white supremacist Richard Spencer -- as part of their campaign against residents whom they call "criminal Jews."

Ex-spy who wrote intel memos is a pro

By Nick Dowling and David Handley
Two former officials, one American and one British, say the material provided by a retired intelligence operative may or may not be true but deserves to be taken seriously, and intelligence should not be politicized

Under Trump, the anti-vaxxers might just win

By Ford Vox
Ford Vox: With Trump's election, anti-vaccination advocates on the left and right have been empowered--and the science-based center may soon find itself on the losing side of politics.

How Trump's reset with Russia can work

By Steve Chabot
Getting along with Russia is a worthy goal, so long as the purpose is to attain a specific set of ends, not friendship for friendship's sake, says Steve Chabot

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    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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      QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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