PHOTO: Snapchat
Now playing
03:25
Influencer: I want to look like I do on Instagram
Chris, a Trump supporter, reacts to a fact check of a manipulated video shared by the Trump campaign.
Chris, a Trump supporter, reacts to a fact check of a manipulated video shared by the Trump campaign.
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
03:58
What Trump supporters see on their Facebook feeds
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
02:03
Watch this former exec compare Facebook to Big Tobacco
Screengrab Nick Clegg facebook
Screengrab Nick Clegg facebook
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
07:34
Facebook exec explains the company's US election actions
Now playing
05:15
Misleading videos shared by Republicans get millions of views
Now playing
02:24
Under questioning, Zuckerberg admits Instagram was a 'competitor'
Now playing
03:31
Congresswoman grills Facebook CEO on copying competitors
PHOTO: From Facebook
Now playing
02:40
Zuckerberg blasts Trump administration for worsening pandemic
Facebook co-founder, Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill April 11, 2018 in Washington, DC. This is the second day of testimony before Congress by Zuckerberg, 33, after it was reported that 87 million Facebook users had their personal information harvested by Cambridge Analytica, a British political consulting firm linked to the Trump campaign.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Facebook co-founder, Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill April 11, 2018 in Washington, DC. This is the second day of testimony before Congress by Zuckerberg, 33, after it was reported that 87 million Facebook users had their personal information harvested by Cambridge Analytica, a British political consulting firm linked to the Trump campaign. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Now playing
03:33
Facebook meeting 'disappointing,' says ad boycott organizer
PHOTO: Shutterstock
Now playing
01:57
Facebook removes Trump ads 'for violating our policy against organized hate'
This picture taken on July 4, 2019 in Nantes, shows logos of the US online social media and social networking service, Facebook. (Photo by LOIC VENANCE / AFP)        (Photo credit should read LOIC VENANCE/AFP via Getty Images)
This picture taken on July 4, 2019 in Nantes, shows logos of the US online social media and social networking service, Facebook. (Photo by LOIC VENANCE / AFP) (Photo credit should read LOIC VENANCE/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: LOIC VENANCE/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
Now playing
02:41
He quit Facebook over Zuckerberg's handling of Trump posts. Hear why
PHOTO: Glenn Chapman/AFP/Getty Images/CNN
Now playing
03:38
He says Facebook's Libra is the future. Lawmakers aren't so sure
PHOTO: YouTube/Financial Services Committee
Now playing
02:15
Zuckerberg struggles to explain whether Facebook fact checks political ads
Mark Zuckerberg remained silent after Congressman Barry Loudermilk compared him to President Trump.
Mark Zuckerberg remained silent after Congressman Barry Loudermilk compared him to President Trump.
Now playing
00:43
Watch Zuckerberg react when a lawmaker compares him to Trump
Facebook
Facebook's CEO Mark Zuckerberg delivers his speech during the VivaTech (Viva Technology) trade fair in Paris, on May 24, 2018. (Photo by GERARD JULIEN / AFP) (Photo credit should read GERARD JULIEN/AFP/Getty Images)
PHOTO: GERARD JULIEN/AFP/Getty Images
Now playing
03:21
This is how Facebook kills its competition
facebook zuckerberg origin business orig _00011530.jpg
facebook zuckerberg origin business orig _00011530.jpg
Now playing
01:47
It took Facebook 15 years to take over the world. Here's how
(CNN Business) —  

Instagram wants hackers to put its latest shopping feature to the test.

The Facebook-owned company said it is inviting a select group of security researchers to stress test its Checkout feature before it expands it beyond the United States.

The tool, which launched in March, allows users to buy products directly on Instagram from a select number of brands, including Zara, H&M and Nike. Previously, users had to leave the Instagram app and purchase the item from the retailer’s website.

Instagram previously said payments on the Checkout feature are secure and processed in partnership with PayPal (PYPL). Instagram has also said it doesn’t share payment information with sellers, and it keeps financial information on secured servers.

The researchers, who are also called white hat hackers, find vulnerabilities before a bad actor might in order to protect users. In this case, they’ll get early access to the global feature and earn rewards for eligible reports. Those who qualify have previously submitted “high-quality” research to its bug bounty program.

In 2018, Facebook paid out over $1.1 million in rewards to researchers from more than 100 countries, who found and reported security vulnerabilities and data abuse. The average award amount was about $1,500 last year.

This isn’t the first time Instagram’s parent company Facebook (FB) has invited white hat hackers to test a feature.

Facebook said it gave a select group of researchers early access to FB5, which is Facebook’s redesigned look that it unveiled at its F8 developers conference earlier this year.

Philippe Harewood, one of the researchers who took part in the private program, found a bug in Facebook’s new interface, which could have let someone remove another person’s profile photo. The company said Harewood’s work allowed the company to fix the issue before it rolled out FB5 around the world.

Facebook is also expanding its data abuse bug bounty program to Instagram, which is intended to find and kick off apps that abuse its platforms. Now researchers will be able to report third-party apps that improperly access and store user data on Instagram.

Facebook started its bug bounty program in 2011. Last year, it launched another program focused on data abuse following revelations that Cambridge Analytica improperly harvested data from millions of users.

The data-abuse-focused program rewards people who report cases where a third-party app collects and transfers people’s Facebook — and now Instagram — data to another party to be sold or used for scams and other purposes. Rewards can go up to $40,000 per case.

Other tech companies also offer bug bounty programs. Google paid out a total of $3.4 million rewards in 2018 to researchers who found vulnerabilities. Earlier this month, Apple (AAPL) said it would offer hackers up to $1 million to hack an iPhone.